The Universe has 10 times more galaxies than scientists thought

This does not take into account Dark Matter which is estimated to be 90 percent of the universe.
By Adam Widmer | Nov 03, 2016
Scientists from NASA discover that the Universe is about ten times bigger that they initially thought. About 20 years, NASA sent their satellite Hubble to space to try and estimate the size of the universe. Due to refraction and other obstructing energies the white light camera of the Hubble capture light from 93 million light years away. From this distance, the team surmised that the universe would hold around 100 million to 200 galaxies.

However, recently NASA used an Infrared camera to try and estimate the size of the universe. The infrared is not easily obstructed like the white light camera. It was able to capture light that is 3 billion light years away.

But this new estimate the size of the universe is almost ten times the initial estimate. Since the light from these images comes from 3 billion years ago. The images, therefore, show pictures of the earlier planetary formation.

The images show smaller planets and galaxies. NASA says that it seems that the universe formed from smaller galaxies and grew. The mass has not changed, however the planarity alignments have.

"The total mass is not increasing. It's just how that mass is distributed is changing," NASA said. "The population is dominated much more by these lower-mass galaxies in the distant universe than what we have in the local universe today."

However, this still does not truly show the full size of the Universe. The light estimate only demonstrates the reach of light. This does not take into account Dark Matter which is estimated to be 90 percent of the universe.

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